Launard House B&B situated in Kilkenny City

Launard House Maidenhill Kells rd Kilkenny 056 7751889 +353 85 280 1010
E-mail launard@eircom.net

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Launard House B&B

A 'Purpose Built' Bed and Breakfast in the Heart of Kilkenny

Launard House B&B

A 'Purpose Built' Bed and Breakfast in the Heart of Kilkenny

Launard House B&B

A 'Purpose Built' Bed and Breakfast in the Heart of Kilkenny

Launard House B&B

A 'Purpose Built' Bed and Breakfast in the Heart of Kilkenny

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Purpose-Built Bed & Breakfast in The Heart Of Kilkenny City
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Kilkenny

Kilkenny--cill cannig in Irish--is both medieval and modern. Situated on the banks of the River Nore, its narrow, winding streets and ancient buildings combine with the progressiveness of a busy, industrious town located in Ireland's Southeast.

The town was the capital of the kingdom of Ossory in pre-Norman times and was named after the church founded by St. Canice in the sixth century. Following the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman invasion, Kilkenny passed into the hands of William le Mareschal, son-in-law to Strongbow. Around 1400, the Earl of Ormonde purchased the lordship of the town from le Mareschal's descendants.

Between 1293 and 1408, Kilkenny was the venue for many parliaments, including one in 1366 which enacted the Statute of Kilkenny. This statute declared marriage between a Norman and an Irishwoman an act of high treason. Moreover, Irishmen were forbidden to reside within a walled town, and penalties were exacted against any Anglo-Norman who should adopt Irish language, customs or dress.

Between 1558 and 1640 the castle's ceilings were richly decorated with stucco work, and elaborate gardens were laid out. The Papal Nuncio to Kilkenny visited in 1646 and declared Bunratty the most beautiful spot he had ever seen.

Kilkenny enjoyed a brief season of glory in the mid-seventeenth century when the Old Irish and the Anglo-Irish Catholics functioned as an independent Irish parliament. Inevitably, the groups split into two camps. The Anglo-Irish made a treaty with the English Viceroy, Ormonde; the Old Irish, supported by the Papal Nuncio, Archbishop Rinuccini, elected as their leader, Owen Roe O'Neill. O'Neill's death in 1649 led to defeat. That, and disunion within the confederation led to an attack by Cromwell. After withstanding siege for many days, they capitulated and a treaty was signed.

Several old buildings remain in this most interesting of towns. We'll start our tour at the parking area along Castle Road. To the right stands Kilkenny Castle, to the left, the old castle stables, now an upscale design center. Look behind you and you'll see the old city walls. Directly ahead, is a skewed intersection where Castle Road, now The Parade, meets Patrick Street, High Street, and Rose Inn Street. Jog to the left, but continue going straight on High Street where, to your left are several places on our itinerary.

The grey stone building on your right is the Shee Alms House and dates from 1582. It closed in 1985 after more than 300 years of service as an alms house and hospital to the city's poor and now houses the Tourist Information Office, a valuable first stop on our tour. Here you may pick up a map showing each building plus a brief description for under £ 2.

Down the lane to your left stands St. Mary's church. Erected in 1202, the church changed hands several times between the Catholic and Protestant communities and is now a community center.

The Tholsel was built in 1761 on the spot where Alice Kyteler's servant, Petronella, was burned at the stake for witchcraft in 1324. The unpolished marble and limestone building now houses the Kilkenny Corporation and many antiquities., including a sword from James I to mark the city's charter in 1609.

A turn to the right brings you to St. Kieran Street and Kyteler's Inn, now one of Kilkenny's most popular bars and restaurants. The oldest house in Kilkenny, it was the home of Dame Alice Kyteler, a lady of great wealth who married four times and who, in 1324, was accused of witchcraft and of poisoning each of her four husbands.

The Tholsel was built in 1761 on the spot where Alice Kyteler's servant, Petronella, was burned at the stake for witchcraft in 1324. The unpolished marble and limestone building now houses the Kilkenny Corporation and many antiquities., including a sword from James I to mark the city's charter in 1609.

 

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